About New Haven Learning Hubs

APPLY NOW

Community Learning Hubs are safe spaces for children to go before, during, and after the school day for supervised distance learning with high-speed internet access, social support, and enrichment, in a small cohort ranging between 10-14 children. Children eligible to attend a Hub must be New Haven residents in Kindergarten through 12th grades, registered for the New Haven Public Schools, and demonstrate high need. Space is extremely limited and families with the greatest need will receive priority. There is no cost to families.

As the school year ends and schools transition back to in-person/hybrid learning, the Learning Hubs are still open for families who are unable to send their children to in-person schooling or still need child care before and after school hours.

 

Learning hubs are operated by some of our community’s core youth development organizations: the Boys and Girls Club of New Haven, the City of New Haven’s Youth and Recreation Department, the Central Connecticut Coast YMCA, and ConnCAT—and the list is growing. Space is generously donated by member churches of the Greater New Haven Clergy Association and National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference’s Faith and Education Coalition. Clifford Beers serves as the Collective’s administrative coordinator, common application manager, and fiscal agent.  


The common application here is for all Hubs participating in the New Haven Learning Hubs Collective, a citywide, grassroots, volunteer-driven network to support children, youth, and families during the COVID-19 pandemic. The primary focus of the Collective is to establish and support Learning Hubs during the 2020-21 school year, within a full or partial distance learning framework.

Partners

  • Boys and Girls Club of New Haven

  • Clifford Beers

  • ConnCAT 

  • Faith and Education Coalition

  • Music Haven

  • New Haven Free Public Library

  • New Haven YMCA Youth Center

  • Solar Youth

  • Families, educators, and community members!

See locations here

Program Overview

 

Program Operators

Hubs are operated by some of our community’s core youth development organizations: the Boys and Girls Club of New Haven, the City of New Haven’s Youth and Recreation Department, the Central Connecticut Coast YMCA, and ConnCAT—and the list is growing. Space to operate some of the Hubs is generously donated by member churches of the Greater New Haven Clergy Association and National Hispanic Christain Leadership Conference’s Faith and Education Coalition. Clifford Beers serves as the Collective’s administrative coordinator and fiscal agent.  

 

Hours, Schedule, and Staffing

Hubs are open for the duration of the 2020-2021 school year and follow the New Haven Public Schools calendar. They are open four or five days per week (Wednesdays vary by program), with varying hours. Each cohort of about ten students has at least two staff facilitators.

 

Transportation

There is no transportation provided. Families must arrange for drop-off and pick-up.

 

Meals

Breakfast and lunch are provided by the New Haven Public Schools. 

 

Eligibility

Eligibility criteria are in place to ensure access to the highest needs children and youth. Participants must be New Haven residents in Kindergarten through through 12th grade, registered for the New Haven Public Schools, and receive one or more of the following services:

  • government subsidies  

  • education for English language learners

  • support from DCF or in foster care

 

Other criteria include families with housing insecurity or experiencing homelessness, essential workers, and single working parent families. 

 

Placement Process

Families are prioritized by need based on the categories above, with a lottery among the highest-needs families if necessary. Children are also placed in the Hub closest to their home. 

 

Waitlist

Interested families who do not receive an initial placement will be put on a waitlist and notified as additional Hub spaces become available. 

 

Infection Control

Hubs strictly adhere to infection control guidelines, including mask wearing, social distancing, and cohorting. 


For additional program information, email us at learninghubs@cliffordbeers.org or contact Seth Poole, Director of System of Care, Clifford Beers at spoole@cliffordbeers.org.

Guiding Principles

 

Collective Tenets

 

  1. Provide a supplemental offering that seeks to help as many families as is possible, not a universal public service

  2. Prioritize disengaged and low-income children and youth, as well as children of essential workers and single working parents, who are part of the City’s most vulnerable populations

  3. Application is via a common application and waiting list, with placement priority given based on need and proximity

  4. Support and collaborate with all partners in their efforts to serve the community, not just those we work with directly

  5. All dollars raised go directly to support Learning Hub operational costs, and are distributed based on a mutually-agreed upon process and criteria

  6. Operate minimally during school hours, five days per week, and provide after school options wherever possible

  7. Aim to serve children and youth of all ages, from K through 9th grade, including paid support roles created for older youth

  8. Participation is free to families, in order to enable equitable access

  9. Adhere to shared Infection Control Guidelines 

  10. Collaborate with New Haven Public Schools’ certified educators by supporting children learning remotely 

  11. Provide supportive programming that is high-quality, developmentally-appropriate, and culturally-affirming

  12. Maximize use of the outdoors and physical recreation

  13. Not a religious program, with no religious programming and religious iconography within houses of worship covered or removed.

  14. Learn from the experiences of other cities undertaking similar initiatives

 

Collective Decision-Making  

 

  1. Decisions are made collectively, using the Comer principles of consensus decision making, no-fault problem solving, and collaboration

  2. A Coordinating Committee exists for the purpose of making general decisions between collective meetings and addressing any concerns. 

  3. The Collective holds a regular meeting open to all (currently, weekly) and maintains a google group that receives all meeting announcements. All are welcome to join here.

  4. Working Groups are established as needed to brainstorm, exchange ideas, and co-create plans around specific topics, e.g. Safety and Operations, Recruitment and Communications, Resources, and Programming.

  5. Concerns should be brought to the Coordinating Committee for resolution.